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bipolar disorder

What Do You Have to Say?

As a writing teacher, I often get the question, “What should I write about?” My response is always, “Write about having nothing to write about.” Believe it or not, most of the time, these students end up with something they actually wanted to say and just couldn't get it out on the page until they were told they had to do it.

We all have something to say, but sometimes we just don't realize it.

Honesty

Being Bipolar and trying to lead a normal life has a lot to do with honesty. I have to try very hard sometimes to come across as a regular person, but as long as I follow a few simple rules, I find I can accomplish it, and then once I break down some of the barriers of stigma related to mental illness, I can be honest with people about having Bipolar. If people know me and are friends, or they are employers who already know I can do a good job, this is rarely a problem.

Successful Aging and Mental Illnesses

Colin A. Depp, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the School of Medicine of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). He is also Staff Psychologist at the San Diego VA, Assistant Director of the Research Education and Training of the Clinical Translational Research Institute and faculty member of the Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging. Dr. Depp received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan and his doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Louisville.

Genetics Counseling for Psychiatric Illness

Angela Inglis is a genetic counselor and a clinical assistant professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of British Columbia. Angela worked in psychiatric research for a number of years, coordinating and overseeing the day to day operations for a research program which involved studies in postpartum depression, stigma among family members of individuals with psychiatric disorders, and a genetic counseling study for individuals with psychiatric disorders (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and schizoaffective disorder).

Stigma Stops Here

I was having a smoothie with a good friend from high school. She found me on facebook. I have not seen her since I graduated in 1998. We decided to get together at a coffee shop to have smoothies. Her name is Janet and she works at Shurr High school in Montebello. She used to work at our former high school as well Montebello High. She was telling me that there are a lot of kids that are hurting and have attempted suicide. She also told me that a lot of kids abuse alcohol and drugs. She told me that there is a Suicide Prevention Team on the campus site.

Men & Clinical Depression: Even the Toughest Hit Tough Times

Men & Clinical Depression: Even the Toughest Hit Tough Times Greg runs a successful high tech company in one of the most upscale, safest suburbs of Los Angeles. His journalist wife and three cheerful children are involved in lots of activities. They have warm family dinners and vacations together with extended family. And yet, anymore when Greg’s kayak or poker friends call to get together, he declines. The effort just doesn’t seem worth it. He’d rather have a drink or two and stay home watching one inane sitcom after another. Some days, he feels the boredom will kill him.

Dear Dr Third Eye aka Dr I don’t want your drama!

Dear Dr Third Eye aka Dr I don’t want your drama!

Albert Einstein once remarked that ‘insanity was doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results’. I have often thought of the aptness of this quote, as I perpetually visited psychiatrists. The faint waft of hope circling my now cynical heart as I embarked upon yet another encounter with the ‘mind doctors’. Another human being, dressed accordingly in creased suit, hoping to reflect the masterly guise of God. What’s the difference between God and a psychiatrist? God knows he is, a psychiatrist thinks he is!

Maximizing All Aspects of Your Health and Wellness

Dr. Susan C. Maloney has worked as a nurse for 25 years and a Family Nurse Practitioner for 16 years in myriad settings including internal medicine, older adults, college health and women's health/mental health issues. 

Being a Woman of Resilience with Bipolar Disorder: Resiliency in Mind Body and Spirit

Cheryl's life perspective is to embrace resiliency while living with bipolar disorder, migraines and fibromyalgia. She and her husband Pete lost their vibrant and kind son Dan, at the young age of 23 to bipolar disorder when he died by suicide in 2011. It is their family's mission to educate and raise awareness about bipolar disorder and in particular in young adults so that no other parent will have to experience such a tragedy.

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