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Caregiver

Author Karen Winter Schwartz

Karen provides a unique perspective as a mother who, because of her biases and ignorance, was totally blindsided by her daughters’ mental illnesses. She shares what was needed to turn her feelings of isolation and helplessness into hope and recovery—for herself and for her entire family. She discusses the root of our biases, fear, and stigma. She offers insight on what is needed to let go of parental guilt and move into advocacy.

When Your Teen Has Bipolar Disorder or Depression

Experts coach parents to expect the worst during the teen years: defiance, acting out, drug experimentation, even minor criminal activity. With friends moaning about their children’s attitudes and outrageous stunts, it’s easy to assume your teenager’s behavior falls in line with the norm. It may and it may not.

It can be difficult to separate teenage moodiness from a more serious mood disorder like bipolar disorder or clinical depression.

When You’re Married to Someone with Bipolar Disorder

As many experiences with bipolar disorder exist as there are people with bipolar. These experiences run the gamut from wonderful and exciting to confusing to disappointing and devastating. This article covers some of the experiences typical of those dealing with a bipolar spouse.

Can I Advocate from the Shadows or Is That Hypocrisy?

As some of you may know, my 21 year old bipolar son was incarcerated last March during a manic episode where he did something that was, in his words “very stupid.” He was in the midst of denying his illness and he was running with the wrong crowd, and self-medicating with drugs and alcohol. I do not excuse his actions, nor does he. Thankfully, he is now facing his illness head on and, though he is in prison, he is in a better place psychologically and emotionally than he has been since his illness presented itself three years ago.

Sometimes it seems like I am the only one fighting for my child

My daughter is 11 yrs old. We’ll call her Bug. Bug was diagnosed bipolar when she was 7. It has been a long, difficult road of ups and downs since then. We went through three schools before anyone would listen to me enough to give her an I.E.P. Finally at the end of her 3rd grade year (and after a hospital stay for a suicide attempt while at school – the 2nd one) the third school evaluated her and decided she “qualified”. Last year, around the end of November, (while in 5th grade) she started having hallucinations again, auditory and visual.