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How To Stay In Touch With Reality During Psychosis

If you have experienced psychosis, you know that it’s a very hard thing to explain to someone who has never experienced it before. When you are in a state of psychosis, it’s extremely hard to be able to tell yourself what is happening to you, and it can be even more difficult to know what to do when in that situation. Here are three things that have helped me when experiencing psychosis.

1. Deep breathing

As soon as you start freaking out or panicking, things only become harder. To prevent this from happening, try and take some deep breaths. Count to ten and let your breathing settle down. Sometimes the right breathing pattern can be enough to settle or even stop psychosis. Make sure your breaths are even and deep, and continue until you feel calm and safe.

2. Safe place

You may not be able to prevent psychosis, but you can lessen the effect it has on you. Get yourself to a safe place, or at the very least to a quieter place. For me, being outside in the rain or sun can help me get in touch with reality again. If you can, grab someone you trust and take them with you, or go alone if that makes you more comfortable.

3. Anchoring objects

Find things around you that you can focus on. There are some good apps available for further help if necessary, but otherwise just find something still and focus your attention on that object as much as possible. Psychosis can only affect you to the extent you are concentrating on it.

Remember to work alongside your mental health professionals; they are there to help you. Take your medications at similar times of the day, and only take them as prescribed. All of this will help you to get the best support possible.

Look after yourself,

Pippa L.

Read more of Pippa's posts here.

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Comments

These are very helpful steps. Your note that psychosis can only take hold of you so long as you are concentrating on it is very informative. I never thought of it that way. I use mindful meditation to help with other mental health issues that I experience but never really thought about it in that way. Thanks for your article.

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