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Brain XP

April 27, 2018

By: Christine Marie Frey

One of the most important things to remember in life is that everybody needs help sometimes. When I was first diagnosed with bipolar disorder, I refused any help that came my way. I didn’t want help from my parents, my teachers, or even my friends. I wanted help from a teenager who could understand what I was going through. I needed somebody who...
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By Lori Lane Murphy

There are times when I bore myself silly.Living with my mental illness is like living with that one person who corners you at every party. You know the one? The one who won’t stop talking. Not only will they not stop talking, they usually have food in stuck in their teeth and you can’t look away.It is tiring.Now, don’t get me wrong. I will always...
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By: Natalia Beiser

After a serious depression, I was declared to be legally disabled and experienced extreme social phobia.  I was rarely able to go in public, except in the middle of the night.  I was afraid that I would be seen by people that I had known in my career and I was immobilized by fear in the thought of seeing them.  The chances of...
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By: Sasha Kildare 

Sometimes desperation inspires action. A while back, the desperation of homelessness ended my eight-year cycle of hospitalizations for bipolar disorder that had begun in my teens.Sixteen years ago, I was struggling with secondary infertility. Through my own research I discovered that my food choices, gaining and losing 30 pounds a year, and being...
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By: Kam

**Spoiler/Trigger Alert**

I’ve had Netflix and Prime for a long time but as I spend most of my free time either studying or engaged in some kind of outdoor activity, I was late to the party with ‘The Walking Dead’. My friends were positively shocked when I told them I’d never seen the show (this was March 2018) so I decided to binge watch the zombie action to catch up, I’m...
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By: Danielle Workman 

Being your own advocate is neverending.In January, I had to be admitted to the emergency room due to an unusual complication to a common ailment. While it wasn’t related to my mental illness at all, the emergency room staff was convinced that it was completely and totally related to it, and in turn exacerbated the situation.Bipolar Disorder comes...
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Aren’t You Jealous?

April 2, 2018

By: Sabrina Ruediger

This series is exploring the mania, including psychosis, in manic episodes of Bipolar I and my experience with that in a psychiatric hospital. I was inspired by a poem I wrote during my stay at Aurora Behavioral Health Psychiatric Unit in 2016, “Aren’t You Jealous”. I had been coming down from a manic episode in my Bipolar and was getting sick of...
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By: Carol Ray, Ph.D.

Prisons and jails have become America's default mental health institutions. More individuals with  severe mental illnesses are housed in prisons and jails than in state psychiatric hospitals. Individuals with severe mental illness, while in prisons or jails, lack the proper treatment and care needed for their conditions. Lack of proper...
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By: Conor Bezane

I still make mixtapes. They may be on CD, but, to me, they will always be mixtapes. Music is my higher power in AA and even though I don’t go to very many meetings anymore, music still plays a pivotal, necessary role in my recovery — for my dual diagnosis of bipolar and addiction.My recovery is emboldened by music. Every day, I listen intently to...
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By: John Poehler 

Getting the news that you have a chronic mental illness can be quite disheartening.  It can be extremely overwhelming.You cannot change the fact that you have bipolar disorder.You can change your perspective about mental illness by reframing your thoughts..I was extremely elated when I first received my diagnosis of bipolar disorder.  ...
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By: Lori Lane Murphy

Before my Bipolar Diagnosis, I didn’t really give much thought to my sleep patterns. I guess that’s because I used alcohol so much that it didn’t seem like an issue. I confused passing out with sleeping for many years and I thought I had this whole resting thing figured out.About eight years ago, I decided that a lifetime of “managing” my illness...
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By Michelle Vasiliu, Author of My Happy Sad Mummy.

In 2007, when I was 40 years old, I experienced my first manic episode. I was duly diagnosed with bipolar one. Knowing what I now know about my condition, it is highly likely those sporadic periods of frenzied activity, little sleep and incredible optimism I’d experienced in between debilitating depressive episodes during my teen years, were...
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