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Alexis Zinkerman

Tips on How to Better Your Relationships While Bipolar

I went off my meds, and the result was not pretty. When I am compliant, my meds work well for me, affording me a relatively normal life. I stabilize on my meds. Then months and years pass, and I think I am cured. I think I don’t need them anymore. So, I stop taking them. At first, everything seems fine, but within a few days, I am paranoid, hearing voices, rapid cycling, talking fast, making poor decisions, and rapidly climbing the ladder of mania. This past time I tested the limits of everybody around me.

Journalists Should Be Educated About Mental Health

The year is 2000. I’m working as a journalist in a small Connecticut shoreline town. I’m barely hanging on. My brain is shorting out. No one on or off staff knows how to help me. 

During this time, I would stay up all night working on stories, then come into work the next morning disheveled and ranting. I would laugh at inappropriate things. My bipolar disorder, diagnosed in 1996 while I was in college, had been triggered and I refused to take medication since the ones they put me on didn’t work anyway. 

Alexis Zinkerman

Alexis Zinkerman is a freelance writer, advocate, and journalist. Her novella Brooklyn’s Song is available on Amazon. She holds an MA in Writing from DePaul University and an MLIS. Alexis loves running, meditation, yoga, photography, cooking healthy foods, and fitness. She was first diagnosed with bipolar 1 in 1996, but it took many more years to find the right treatment course.